Craft Chat

The Worst Quiche Ever

If there’s one thing I’ve learned about blogging, it’s this: it’s always better, with a more genuine outcome, to write about what’s happened naturally rather than trying to force something to happen just so you can write about it.  I find that this is especially true with food (need I remind you of my epic failure with the Molten Nutella recipe?)

Case in point: Mom’s Quiche.  I grew up eating my Mom’s quiche.  She got her recipe from a friend she made in Tunisia, a fellow ex-pat mother with a son in my one-year-old play group, made up of American mothers associated with the Embassy.  The recipe Mom usually made is vegetarian, but quiche is so customizable that you can add almost anything to it.  I grew up with olives and cheese and probably some spinach hidden in there too.  I’ve never eaten a quiche in a restaurant that I actually like–it just doesn’t taste like Mom’s.

But.  As many quiches as Mom has made in her life, when we made it here in San Francisco, it didn’t turn out at all.  I scribbled down notes (Mom made it from memory) and took pictures along the way, happily anticipating the blog post about cooking with my Mama.  Well, I guess the pressure was too much.  (Sigh… isn’t it sad to take such optimistic pictures, only to have the end result unsuccessful?)  Plus, my oven is weird.  It heats up to the desired temperature, then turns off until it needs to up the temp again… like an old air conditioner or a jumpy cruise control.  Not exactly conducive to consistent results.  For whatever reason (mostly the oven), Mom said it was the worst quiche ever made!  Not fit for the internet!

However, I begged to differ.  It still tasted like home to me.

Mom made me promise not to write about it online unless we made it again, with a redeeming photograph, and the real measurements.  So we called Dad for the official recipe, handwritten in Mom’s collection of recipes from friends and family and cookbooks, and I typed it up as she repeated it aloud.

So here, Mom’s Quiche, complete with optimistic pictures and real results.  I promise, it’s really good!

Mama’s Vegetarian Quiche Lorraine

Ingredients:

~2 deep dish pie crusts

~1 tablespoon softened butter

~4 eggs

~2 cups heavy whipping cream

~¾ teaspoon seasoned salt

~1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

~1 teaspoon basil

~¼ lb shredded cheese

~optional ingredients: finely chopped olives, (frozen, drained) spinach, onions, broccoli, asparagus,
(meat): ham, shrimp, bacon

The Cast of Characters, as P-Dub would say

Steps:

1.) Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

2.) Whisk eggs, heavy cream, nutmeg, basil, and salt in a bowl.  Stir in the cheese.

Got to use my immersible blender, one of those wedding gifts that I love but rarely actually use!

3.) Add optional ingredients to the bottom of the piecrust.

4.) Pour egg mixture onto crust and mix lightly with a fork.

5.) Sprinkle with basil.

6.) Bake 15 minutes at 425 degrees.

Baking inside my tiny weird oven, that randomly heats up and cools down

7.) VERY IMPORTANT: Cover with foil, turn heat down to 325 degrees for 35 minutes.

Serve immediately.

First Attempt: Not fit for your viewing pleasure, according to Mom

Yields 2 pies.  Freeze leftovers as individual slices.

Despite Mom’s reservations, the quiche still made it to the table with peas, carrots, and crescent rolles.  And I loved it!

We never got that redeeming photograph–the second batch that Mom made was cut up and eaten before I remembered to take a picture.

But for Mom’s sake, here’s the imagined redeeming photo:

[photo source]

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